2

DIY Daisy Chain Choker

Jessthetics / DIY Daisy Chain Choker

After using Thermomorph to make a plant pot last week, I had loads of pellets left so I decided to have a go at making some plastic jewellery. I used a cookie cutter again, this time in the cutest little daisy shape! I’ve attached the plastic flowers to a choker I bought from eBay. Who knew 90s “tattoo” chokers would be cool again? Oh well, I’m not complaining!

Jessthetics / DIY Daisy Chain Choker

You will need: Thermomorph, Choker, Cookie Cutter, Acrylic paint, PVA glue, glue gun and glue, paintbrushes, a small amount of felt, scissors, a pencil, a bowl, a rolling pin and a chopping board.

Jessthetics / DIY Daisy Chain Choker

Fill a bowl with boiling water, and add a handful of thermomorph pellets. After a minute they’ll become transparent and be ready to use! / Scoop out some thermomorph, roll it flat and cut out a shape with your cookie cutter. / My cookie cutter didn’t go right through the plastic, so I turned it upside down and peeled the plastic away. / To neaten up the edges, dunk your flowers back into the hot water for a minute and use your hands to push the edges back into shape.

Jessthetics / DIY Daisy Chain Choker

Once they’ve cooled, paint your flowers and once they’re dry, coat them with a layer of PVA glue. / Draw around your flowers on the felt and cut the shapes out. / Use the glue gun to glue the flowers to the choker, with the felt backing the other side of the choker.

Jessthetics / DIY Daisy Chain Choker

Jessthetics / DIY Daisy Chain Choker

And that’s it! The choker I bought was a little wide for my neck, so I’d love to have a go with one that sits further up. I’ve never used sculpey clay but I imagine clay might also work for the flowers. You could totally make a range of daisy accessories with this method – daisy hair slides would be the cutest!

Advertisements
6

Elephant Plantpot with Thermomorph

When Thermomorph first contacted me, I thought the product sounded a little like a character from a superhero movie. It’s not actually a type of transformer, but a box of moldable plastic! Think play dough for grownups, you pour the little plastic balls into a bowl of boiling water and you get a lump of plastic that you can mold into whatever you like. Because this stuff sets very quickly (I’m talking a minute, maybe two tops) I wouldn’t recommend using it for anything intricate. I cut shapes out of the thermomorph with this miniature elephant cookie cutter, which I used for this cute elephant plant pot! I painted the elephants yellow, obviously, because yellow is my favourite colour and I’m very predictable. Here’s how!

You will need: A pot of thermomorph (which you can buy from amazon here)! A cookie cutter, a plantpot, some PVA glue, a knife, a chopping board, a rolling pin, paint and paintbrushes.

Fill a bowl with boiling water and add a handful of thermomorph plastic balls. / Once the plastic is transparent, use a spoon (or tongs) to remove a chunk of plastic. Use your rolling pin to roll it flat, with a depth of a cm or two. Cut the thermomorph with the cookie cutter, and wiggle around! / This stuff is pretty sticky so flip the cutter over to pull away most of the excess plastic. / To remove the thermomorph from the cutter, submerge it in a bowl of cold water. Because the plastic sets quickly, go through this process one elephant at a time! Add more hot water if the bowl cools down before you’re finished.

My elephants were still a little imperfect around the edges, so I dunked them back into the hot water for 5 seconds to soften them, before cutting away the extra plastic and shaping them around the curve of the pot. / Use PVA to glue your elephants down! / Paint your pot. I did several coats of white acrylic first, and then used yellow acrylic to pick out the elephants.

I’m not sure whether this plant pot is sophisticated or if it looks like a pre-school project, but either way it’s cheerful and it has elephants on it so you can’t go wrong! I’ve been pinning lots of plant-filled rooms onto my home inspiration board and longing for a jungley home, it’s just a shame I’m not very good at keeping plants alive. You can’t kill cacti though, right?

*Thermomorph was sent to me for free, but all opinions (and my addiction to the colour yellow) are my own.

7

DIY Thread Holder

I’ve been doing  a lot of sewing recently, and as a result I’ve collected a lot of thread! I could no longer close the lid on my sewing box so I knew I needed a better storage solution. This yellow thread holder stores a lot (181 spools to be exact) and it’s beautifully colourful 🙂 Now I just need to fill up all that empty space! I decided to use nails as bobbin holders on the bottom half only because I usually have much more thread than bobbins. And here’s how I did it…

You will need: A large rectangular piece of MDF (mine’s 1220 by 606mm and it’s 6mm thick) 10 metres of 6mm dowel sticks, a drill and a 6mm drill bit, a saw, a pack of thin nails, wood glue, 2 picture mounts and screws, 2 picture hooks and some paint (I used spray paint, but in retrospect regular paint would have been better.)

To begin with, saw your piece of MDF exactly in half. / Decide where you want your spools to go. I drew lines 2.5 inches apart both horizontally and vertically along one half of the MDF. / Drill holes through the MDF at each point where the lines you drew intersect. If you haven’t used a drill before, get someone to help you! / Saw your pieces of dowel into 5.5cm long strips.

Squeeze a little wood glue onto the end of each strip of dowel and insert them firmly into the holes you drilled. / Once the glue is dry, cover the back of the MDF with wood glue and adhere this to your second piece of MDF (not pictured.) Whilst drying, I placed jam jars over the strips of dowel and balanced heavy books on top of the jam jars. That way, the MDF will be sandwiched firmly together when dry and you won’t snap any of the dowel strips! Once this is dry, paint the entire thing. / When the paint is dry, hammer nails in between the dowel strips. These will hold bobbins! I only hammered nails onto the bottom half, since I usually have more spools of thread than bobbins. / Screw picture mounts onto both top back corners.

Hammer your picture hooks into the wall and hang up your thread holder!

This project ended up taking me a long time because the wood needed so many layers of spray paint. Note to self, use paint brush paint in future! I feel like I’ve done a lot of DIY posts featuring this corner of my room lately, so hopefully that means it’s nearly finished. I’ll hopefully move into my flat in Edinburgh next month, and I’ve been doing  lot of furniture browsing and decorating planning. I’m so excited!

13

DIY Fabric Covered Lamp

One of the things on my to-do list for this year is to revamp by room a bit. I love my carpet and walls, but I’m in desperate need of some better storage solutions and some of my furnishings could do with a more colourful update. I also have plans for a big gallery wall! Project number one is my bedside lamp. I like the yellow base, but I’ve had the old lampshade for so long that it had doodles on it from when I was younger… so I covered the lampshade in vintage fabric and used some lace to spray paint a pattern on the base!

You will need: An old lamp, vintage fabric (1/2 meter would be plenty). hot glue gun (although PVA would probably work too), fabric scissors, wrapping paper, patterned lace, spray paint.

If you want to spray paint onto your base like I did, remove the lampshade and wrap the patterned lace around the bottom of the lamp a couple of times. Secure at the top with tape. I used gold paint, but I’m not sure of how it looks against the yellow. If I did it again I’d probably use black or white! Spray all over, leave to dry, and remove the lace. / For the lamp shade, place it onto the wrapping paper, and roll it around 360 degrees whilst drawing around the shade. / Add an extra couple of inches at the top of the bottom and the side of  of the semi-circle, and cut out the shape. / Pin the wrapping paper shape to your vintage fabric, and cut out the shape.

Iron one of the vertical sides over by an inch. Drape the fabric over the lamp, making sure to smooth out all the creases, and glue the un-ironed vertical side onto the lampshade. / Squeeze a strip of glue onto the back of the ironed side of fabric, and press down. / Fold the fabric at the bottom under into the lampshade and glue down. Cut off any excess fabric. / Fold the fabric at the top over into the lampshade and glue down. Cut off any excess fabric, and this is what the inside should look like!

And you’re finished! I think it’s a pretty cute lamp. Soon my room will be full of clashing patterns and fabrics, yippee! And if you’re interested, the artwork at the back is something I did for my A level art, as part of my “teacup” project. I know it’s twee, but it’s colourful so I like it! The teapot was a gift from James, and I made the log vase!

7

How To Make A Maxi Skirt

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtJessthetics / How To Make A Maxi Skirt

A week ago I showed you guys how to make this red skirt. This week I used the tutorial to make myself a maxi skirt! I’ve simplified the process slightly, so I thought I’d share a new updated tutorial. This took me two hours to sew from scratch – two hours! I dare you to find a quicker method. The high, elasticated waist is something that really suits my style, and I love the 70s pattern I chose even if I do say so myself! I can’t wait to wear this constantly this spring.

You will need: 1 meter of fabric, 1 meter of wide elastic, a needle, thread, scissors, pencil, measuring tape and a sewing machine.

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtThis skirt will consist of two identical rectangular panels. For the length of each short side: measure the widest part of your hips, halve this and add two inches. For the length of each long side: measure the distance between your waist and the part where you want the skirt to end and add four inches. Cut out your two panels!

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtSew the long sides of your panels together, right sides facing, making sure the pattern lines up at the sides / Hem the skirt by folding the fabric over by an inch and sewing in place / At the other end, turn the fabric over by half an inch and iron down / Sew this in place

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtAt the same end that you did the ironing, fold the fabric over again, leaving enough room to thread your elastic. Sew in place, leaving a gap to pass your elastic through / Pass the elastic through the gap and sew the ends of your elastic together

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtSew up the gap, and you have a finished skirt!

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtJessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtIf you use one of my tutorials I’d love to see 🙂 Have you been doing any sewing projects recently? I’m on a bit of a sewing kick!

8

How To Make An Elasticated-Waist Skirt

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtJessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtI spotted this red pu leather fabric in a shop in York and I knew that I had to make it into something! I decided that it would make a really cute high-waisted skirt and I spent the morning sewing one, and that afternoon wearing it! This is a really easy and worthwhile project – skirts like this are such a wardrobe basic! If you’ve never made your own clothes before, this would be a great place to start. You don’t even need a pattern!

You will need: One meter of your chosen fabric, a needle, thread, scissors, sewing machine, measuring tape, pencil and elastic two inches longer than the length of your waist.

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtFirst you need to draw your pattern piece. The skirt will be made up of two panels – one for the front and one for the back. Begin by drawing one half of one panel (as above.) To work out the length of side 1, measure the widest part of your hips, divide this by four and add 1 and 1/2 inches. To work out the length of side 2, measure the widest part of your hips, divide this by four and add 1/2 an inch. To work out the length of side 3, measure the distance between your waist and the part of your legs where you want the skirt to end and add 3 1/2 inches. Lastly, join up side 1 and side 2 by hand, including the small curve at the top.

Cut out all sides apart from side 3. Fold the fabric over along side 3 and draw around the other three edges to form a whole panel. Cut this panel out and trace around it to get your second panel.

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtPlace your two panels right sides together and sew along the right and left edges 1/2 an inch from the edge / Turn the fabric at the top edge over by 1/2 inch and sew down / Fold the fabric at the top edge over again, making sure to leave enough room for your elastic to pass through the waistband. Sew almost the whole way around, leaving some room to thread your elastic through / Thread your elastic through the waistband and sew the edges of the elastic firmly together!

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtSew up the gap that you used to pass the waistband through / Fold the fabric at the bottom edge over by 1 inch and sew to create the hem.

And you’re finished! I found sewing with this fabric really hard at first, but if you put a sheet of tissue paper over the fabric as you’re sewing, it won’t get caught under your machine foot and you can tear it off straight after!

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtJessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtJessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist Skirt

What do you think? If you make something like this I would LOVE to see it!

12

Crochet Socks

Crochet Socks / JesstheticsCrochet Socks / Jessthetics

For Christmas (how long ago was that?!) I promised James that I would crochet him a pair of socks, and I have! I thought socks would be a lot easier to crochet than they were. I crocheted along with this video which shows you how to make socks for a ladies size 7. James has big feet so I had to make a lot of adjustments, and some of them were more successful than others! As a result, the socks are slightly different sizes but I’ve been told they’re comfy and that’s what matters 🙂 The thick wool I used made for gorgeously chunky socks, perfect for lounging around the house and keeping your toes warm.

Crochet Socks / JesstheticsCrochet socks / JesstheticsCrochet socks / Jessthetics

If anyone uses this video to make socks, drop me an email and I can tell you where I made adjustments. It was definitely helpful to have James around so he could try the socks on as I was crocheting. Hopefully now he’ll stop stealing mine!  I’ve been browsing pinterest for patterns, and I’m tempted to crochet a whole wardrobe!
p.s. Jessthetics now has a facebook page! I’d appreciate it if you could pop over and give it a like 🙂

7

Mario Mushroom Crochet

I am so excited to have finished this project! Sometime in summer I read this post by love elycia about her Mario Mushroom blanket. My little brother is seriously obsessed with everything Nintendo so I knew I wanted to make one for him. It started out as a birthday gift but it had to become a Christmas gift because it was taking me such a long time. Three months later and it’s ready! When planning out this blanket I only left myself a couple of days to sew the squares together. It turns out the granny squares take just as long to be sewn together than they take to be crocheted.

mario mushroom 1mario mushroom 2mario mushroom 3

Before I made this blanket I had never crocheted before. I’m very much a dive-in-at-the-deep end kind of girl when it comes to crafts. I learnt how to crochet a granny square using this lovely Youtube channel and I learnt how to crochet the squares together using this blog post. My first granny square took me between four and five hours but once I got the hang of it they took around twenty minutes. There’s close to two hundred granny squares in this blanket though, so it still took me a long time! Crocheting is a craft I’ve really enjoyed. It’s nice to come home after work, watch some tv and get crocheting. It’s like being lazy and productive at the same time! I’ve also been taking my granny squares on train journeys with me, which has been lovely when I don’t feel like reading.

mario mushroom 5mario mushroom 4(This is what the back of the blanket looks like.)

I’m so pleased with how this blanket turned out and I think my brother is too (if you’re reading, it’s on its way!) And I learnt a new skill. Crochet socks and a granny stripe blanket are next on my crochet list! Have you ever crocheted anything?

2

Autumn Stitching Club #12

I know what you’re thinking, Autumn was a long time ago! Yes it was but I haven’t finished my autumn embroidery project yet so let’s forget that it’s now January. This is the penultimate pattern for the Autumn Stitching Club. I’ve enjoyed it, but I will be glad to see it finished. I feel like I’ve been embroidering forever! This week’s pattern is a cute little smiley acorn.

asc 23asc 24

I hope your week’s been off to a good start. This is my second week of my new job and new house! I’m enjoying it, but I miss sleeping in. Oh well, there’s always the weekends! Happy Tuesday 🙂

10

Lavender Bunnies

lavender bunnies 1lavender bunnies 2

Last Christmas (all the way back in 2012!) James bought me this book on vintage inspired handmade gifts. It’s so beautiful, it sits on my windowsill next to my Rookie yearbook, and my Tea Party book. Books with big pictures are my favourite. Anyway, I spent last christmas writing essays and I promised my mum that when I graduated we would make the lavender bunnies in my book as gifts. And we did! I know some of my friends and family read my blog, so I didn’t want to write about these before Christmas – I wanted the bunnies to be a surprise. I’m so pleased with how they turned out. They’re not symmetrical but I think they’re cute. The fabric I chose frayed like crazy but once we figured out how to work with it they were super fun to make 🙂

lavender bunnies 3

You will need: Fabric (I used 3/4s of a meter of vintage plaid fabric from ebay), greaseproof paper, pencil, fabric scissors, lavender (you can buy dried lavender online), polyester stuffing, needle and thread, embroidery floss, embroidery needle, ribbon, small pom poms, sewing machine (optional)

lavender bunnies 4

We traced the bunny shape onto greaseproof paper (remembering to leave an inch for the seam) cut it out, pinned it onto the fabric, and cut out 24 bunny shapes I pinned two sides of the bunny together and sewed around the edges, leaving one side of the head unstitched We snipped into the corners of the bunny and pushed the fabric through the hole so that the bunny was the right way around I stuffed the bunnies, alternating between polyester stuffing and lavender

Lavender Bunnies 5

I hand sewed the stuffing hole closed We hand sewed on the pom poms as tails, tied the ribbon around their necks and embroidered eyes noses and mouths using the embroidery floss.

I rarely craft with others, so it was really fun to make bunnies with my mum – especially since they were completed twice as fast! They’re one of my favourite things I’ve ever made, I hope they enjoy their new homes.

lavender bunnies 6lavender bunnies 11