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Autumn Stitching Club #13

If you’ve been following my blog for a little while you’ll know that I’ve been working on my embroidery for the autumn stitching club for a long time. As you can tell, since autumn and christmas have been and gone! I can gladly say that this is my last embroidered pattern for the autumn stitching club. The next time you hear me talking about it I should have sew all my patterns together as a pillow! I think it’s fitting that the last pattern is a pumpkin. Pumpkin’s are the most quintessentially autumnal for me. As soon as October rolls around I’ll be stocking up on pumpkins, making them into soup and carving little faces into them 🙂 My stitched pumpkin’s a little jaunty but I think he’s cute. He’s characterful.

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I hope you’re having a beautiful Thursday. I’m looking forward to four consecutive weekends of visitors in our little house, starting this Saturday. It’s going to be busy but I’m so excited to see everyone!

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Autumn Stitching Club #9

The first time I ever tried a piece of pumpkin pie was this autumn! You can’t be a real blogger unless you love pumpkin, right? I made a couple of pumpkin pies, and although I haven’t got the recipe right yet, they were pretty tasty 🙂 I just wish shops sold pumpkins in the UK for longer than two weeks in October. Anyway, here is my third pumpkin pie of the season, but this time it’s embroidered. This pattern is for the autumn stitching club, of which you can see more here.

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At least the garden is overflowing with apples from our trees, so I could always make apple pie! I’m excited to finish all my autumn embroidery patterns so that I can turn them into a cushion 🙂 Have a great day!

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How did your halloween go? I had a house party, and had a great time dressing up as a pumpkin! James dressed up as a carrot, for some reason that I can’t remember. Maybe it’s his favourite vegetable. These are some post party photos of us all dressed up.

I’m sorry the photos aren’t the best quality, I’m saving up for a proper camera, but for the moment I just have my phone. I made both our costumes, so I thought I’d show you how I did it.

PUMPKIN

For the pumpkin, you will need: Fabric scissors, Orange felt (I used 2 metres), Black felt (I used ¼ of a meter), Orange thread, a Needle, a Pen and a Sewing machine (optional).

Step 1: Cut your orange fabric in half widthways, and then fold it in half lengthways. Then draw your pumpkin outline on the fabric like this:

The blue line on the bottom is where the fold in your fabric should be. You can adjust the arm holes and the width of the bottom to fit you. Once you’ve unfolded it, you should be left with the front of your pumpkin, which looks like this:

Step 2: Place the pumpkin shape onto your second half of orange fabric, and draw around it. Then cut it out. I find it easier if I pin one piece of the fabric to the other whilst I’m drawing around it, so that it doesn’t slip. This should give you the second half of your pumpkin. I did the neckline on the back half of the pumpkin so that it’s less low that the neckline on the front.

Step 3: Next, you want to sew together the front and the back of your pumpkin, along this line:

I sewed mine together loosely first, and then ran it through the sewing machine, but you can do it by hand too.

Step 4: Cut out the eyes and the mouth of the pumpkin out of the black felt. You can do whatever shape you want, but I did mine like this:

Step 5: Turn your pumpkin inside out, so that the seams are in the inside. Sew the eyes and the mouth onto the front of your pumpkin, but make sure you don’t sew them onto the back as well!

Ta da, your pumpkin is now finished 🙂 Since my hair is already green at the ends, I didn’t need to make a stalk, I just tied my hair up on the top of my head instead

CARROT

For the carrot you will need: Fabric scissors, Orange and green thread, Orange felt (2 metres), Green stretchy material (1/4 of a meter), a Needle, a Pen, a Sewing machine (optional), a Paintbrush, and Brown acrylic paint.
Making the carrot is very similar to making the pumpkin, which makes things lots easier 🙂

Step 1: Cut your orange fabric in half widthways, and then fold it in half lengthways. Then draw your carrot outline on the fabric like this:


The blue line to the right is where the fold in your fabric should be. You can adjust the arm holes and the width of the bottom to fit you. Once you’ve unfolded it, you should be left with the front of your carrot, which looks like this:

Step 2: Place the carrot shape onto your second half of orange fabric, and draw around it. Then cut it out. I find it easier if I pin one piece of the fabric to the other whilst I’m drawing around it, so that it doesn’t slip. This should give you the second half of your carrot. I did the neckline on the back half of the carrot so that it’s slightly less low that the neckline on the front.

Step 3: Next, you want to sew together the front and the back of your carrot, along this line:

When James tried on the carrot, it was a bit too small for him, so I added an extra 6-inch panel in the back of the carrot.

I sewed mine together loosely first, and then ran it through the sewing machine, but you can do it by hand too.

Step 4: Turn your carrot inside out, so that your seams are on the inside. Then, I mixed some brown acrylic paint with water, and painted the stripes onto the fabric to look like ridges in the carrot. One of the many wonderful things about acrylic paint is that it doesn’t take very long to dry!

Step 5: This is the part where you make the hat. First, I drew this shape onto the green fabric and cut it out. Make sure you adjust the size of the hat to the size of your head! It doesn’t have to have a corner, that was just my lazy cutting.

To do the other side of the hat, just trace around the side that you’ve cut out and cut this side out too. You might find it easier to pin them together whilst you’re drawing around the side of the hat.

Step 6: Sew the sides if the hat together along this line:

Step 7: Cut out some strips from the green fabric, in different lengths. I did 10 strips, but if you want your stalk to look fuller, then you can do more. Turn your hat inside out, and then sew your stalks onto the top.

Yay, now you have a carrot costume!

Here are some pictures of me and James having fun at the PARDY

What did you dress up as for Halloween?