7

Marbled Photo Frames

Jessthetics / Marbled Photo Frames
Jessthetics / Marbled Photo FramesThe next project in my quest to add colour to everything in my room is this cute marbled picture frame DIY! I actually bought these frames thinking that I would decorate them with a tiled mosaic, but that proved to be too difficult. I’m glad I marbled them instead though because this project is easier, cheaper, quicker and filled with just as much colour!
Jessthetics / Marbled Photo FramesYou will need: A container to dunk your frames into, a frame, nail polish in several colours, tape, and a wooden stick.

I decided that I just wanted the front of my frames to be marbled, so I began by removing the glass and backing from my frames and taping the sides to protect them!
Jessthetics / Marbled Photo FramesFill your container with a couple of inches of water, and add your nail polish. Be aware that it dries quickly (especially fast drying nail polish!) so you’re going to need to work fairly fast. I found it easiest to pour nail polish out of the bottle with the bottle close to the water, and swirl the polish around slowly. If I poured too quickly, the polish dissolved into the water rather than sitting on top.
Jessthetics / Marbled Photo FramesDunk your frame into the water! Since my frame was bigger than my container, I dipped in one section at a time. It didn’t matter if I dipped a part of the frame that had already been dipped, since the overlap had a pretty effect.
Jessthetics / Marbled Photo FramesI did four or five different nail polish patterns before both frames were covered with the marble effect. The nail varnish left a skin on the top of the water (kind of like the skin on milk when you heat it in the mocrowave.) I removed this with a wooden stick in-between patterns so that it didn’t stick to my frames!
Jessthetics / Marbled Photo Frames
Jessthetics / Marbled Photo FramesTa da! All finished. Now you just need to hang your frames! I feel like I say this every time I post a project, but this really is a simple DIY. You could whip these up in under an hour, and the fun thing is that you can marble almost anything with this technique! I think my Van Gough print looks super cute in this marbled frame, and now I just need to buy a print to display in the second one!

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10

How to Make A Lacy Bra

How To Make A Lacy Bra / JesstheticsHow To Make A Lacy Bra / JesstheticsHow To Make A Lacy Bra / JesstheticsLately I’ve been drawn to triangle bras on pinterest, like this one. I don’t actually wear bras day-to-day, but they’re fun to have for special occasions! Underwear is so expensive, especially for the small amount of fabric that you buy, so I decided to DIY my own triangle bra. Joe took these photos for me when I was in Southampton last week, and we had so much fun!

You will need: 1/4 metre of cotton fabric, 1 metre of wide lace, 1 metre of thin elastic, greaseproof paper, measuring tape, pen, scissors, needle and thread, sewing machine.

How To Make A Lacy Bra / Jessthetics

First, you need to get your measurements. I don’t have any expertise in pattern cutting, so there’s probably a different way of doing this, but this is what worked for me! For the width of each cup, measure the distance under your bust where the bottom of a bra sits, and add an inch (let’s call this length 1.) For the height of each cup, measure the distance between the bottom of your bust and just above your armpit and add an inch (let’s call this length 2.)

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For your pattern piece, draw length 2 on your greaseproof paper, then draw length 1 two inches from the bottom. The rest is just a matter of joining up the lines as above, making sure all three are curved! Cut out your pattern piece and use it to cut two bra cups from the cotton fabric.

How To Make A Lacy Bra / JesstheticsInsert a dart which runs from the middle of the bottom of each cup to the middle of each cup. To get the dart right, I tried on the fabric piece and adjusted it until it curved in the right way / Hem the edges by 1/2 an inch, with a zig zag stitch / Cut a strip of elastic to go around your torso, and sew the ends firmly together / Sew the cups onto the elastic so that the elastic is on the right side of the bra. Cut two strips of elastic for the straps, and sew these onto the cups and the back of the bra. To get the right positioning, keep trying things on as you go! Remember that the cups should be far enough apart that you can add lace to the inside of each.

How To Make A Lacy Bra / Jessthetics

Finally, sew on your lace! I stitched the lace where it met the elastic at the top and bottom of each cup, as well as along the inner edge of the cup. And you’re finished! I later decided to add an extra dart to the side of each cup to give it more of a curve.

How To Make A Lacy Bra / JesstheticsThis isn’t really a practical bra, but it is pretty. Would you ever attemp to make your own undies?

7

How To Make A Maxi Skirt

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtJessthetics / How To Make A Maxi Skirt

A week ago I showed you guys how to make this red skirt. This week I used the tutorial to make myself a maxi skirt! I’ve simplified the process slightly, so I thought I’d share a new updated tutorial. This took me two hours to sew from scratch – two hours! I dare you to find a quicker method. The high, elasticated waist is something that really suits my style, and I love the 70s pattern I chose even if I do say so myself! I can’t wait to wear this constantly this spring.

You will need: 1 meter of fabric, 1 meter of wide elastic, a needle, thread, scissors, pencil, measuring tape and a sewing machine.

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtThis skirt will consist of two identical rectangular panels. For the length of each short side: measure the widest part of your hips, halve this and add two inches. For the length of each long side: measure the distance between your waist and the part where you want the skirt to end and add four inches. Cut out your two panels!

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtSew the long sides of your panels together, right sides facing, making sure the pattern lines up at the sides / Hem the skirt by folding the fabric over by an inch and sewing in place / At the other end, turn the fabric over by half an inch and iron down / Sew this in place

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtAt the same end that you did the ironing, fold the fabric over again, leaving enough room to thread your elastic. Sew in place, leaving a gap to pass your elastic through / Pass the elastic through the gap and sew the ends of your elastic together

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtSew up the gap, and you have a finished skirt!

Jessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtJessthetics / How To Make A Maxi SkirtIf you use one of my tutorials I’d love to see 🙂 Have you been doing any sewing projects recently? I’m on a bit of a sewing kick!

8

How To Make An Elasticated-Waist Skirt

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtJessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtI spotted this red pu leather fabric in a shop in York and I knew that I had to make it into something! I decided that it would make a really cute high-waisted skirt and I spent the morning sewing one, and that afternoon wearing it! This is a really easy and worthwhile project – skirts like this are such a wardrobe basic! If you’ve never made your own clothes before, this would be a great place to start. You don’t even need a pattern!

You will need: One meter of your chosen fabric, a needle, thread, scissors, sewing machine, measuring tape, pencil and elastic two inches longer than the length of your waist.

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtFirst you need to draw your pattern piece. The skirt will be made up of two panels – one for the front and one for the back. Begin by drawing one half of one panel (as above.) To work out the length of side 1, measure the widest part of your hips, divide this by four and add 1 and 1/2 inches. To work out the length of side 2, measure the widest part of your hips, divide this by four and add 1/2 an inch. To work out the length of side 3, measure the distance between your waist and the part of your legs where you want the skirt to end and add 3 1/2 inches. Lastly, join up side 1 and side 2 by hand, including the small curve at the top.

Cut out all sides apart from side 3. Fold the fabric over along side 3 and draw around the other three edges to form a whole panel. Cut this panel out and trace around it to get your second panel.

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtPlace your two panels right sides together and sew along the right and left edges 1/2 an inch from the edge / Turn the fabric at the top edge over by 1/2 inch and sew down / Fold the fabric at the top edge over again, making sure to leave enough room for your elastic to pass through the waistband. Sew almost the whole way around, leaving some room to thread your elastic through / Thread your elastic through the waistband and sew the edges of the elastic firmly together!

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtSew up the gap that you used to pass the waistband through / Fold the fabric at the bottom edge over by 1 inch and sew to create the hem.

And you’re finished! I found sewing with this fabric really hard at first, but if you put a sheet of tissue paper over the fabric as you’re sewing, it won’t get caught under your machine foot and you can tear it off straight after!

Jessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtJessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist SkirtJessthetics / How To Make An Elasticated Waist Skirt

What do you think? If you make something like this I would LOVE to see it!

5

DIY Scented Candles

I love things that smell good, especially during winter when I’m spending a lot of time indoors. I burn a lot of joss sticks but I also love scented candles, and this is my third tutorial featuring essential oils! (DIY one, DIY two.) I find Yankee Candles super expensive though, especially when it’s so easy to make your own! I think it would be hard to replicate the smell of a Yankee Candle using this DIY, but these candles are still really cute.

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You will need: Glass containers for your candles (you can find so much cute cheap glassware in charity shops, that’s where mine come from!) candle wicks, candle wax (I recommend using either an unwanted candle that’s broken or dirty or soy wax, which is eco-friendly), spray paint, tape, kebab skewers, essential oil, and a doily.

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Obviously you can use any essential oil, but I am totally addicted to lavender! I think it’s the most relaxing scent.

Scented Candles 4

Cut your doily in half and cut each half into a semi-circle • Tape your doilies onto your glassware so that they overlap. Make sure they sit flat otherwise your pattern will smudge, and make sure you don’t put tape on the part you want to paint! • Turn your glass upside down and spray paint the bottom • Whilst your glass is drying, move on to the next step

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If you are recycling a candle like me, scrape any of the damaged parts from the wax with a knife • Melt the candle in a double burner (this is a pan on top of a pan full of water – you don’t want your wax to cook!) and remove the wick. You can recycle the wick too if you like! If you’re using soy wax just melt this in the pan • Tape two kebab sticks to the top of the glass, and wedge the wick in between them. This will hold the wick in place • Add a couple of drops of essential oil to your wax and pour it into your container. Wax sinks as it cools, so you will need to add more wax after a couple of hours.

scented candles 6

I did a second candle, but instead of using doilies I just taped the top of my glass before spray painting it. This is so simple but I think it’s really effective.

What do you think of my DIY? I think these would make great christmas presents, and you can be as creative as you like with both the scent and the way you decorate your glass! I’m keeping these for myself, they make my room so cosy 🙂

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Have you ever made candles before? Happy Wednesday friends!

8

DIY Tree Stump Vase

I have finally sorted through every last cupboard, box and drawer in my room, and I’ve banished everything I don’t need to the attic or a charity bag. My next project is to make it look pretty and homely! I saw this pin of a tree stump vase by Martha Stewart a while ago, and I desperately wanted to make one but I couldn’t find an existing DIY. I knew I wanted to make it in a way that anyone could do at home (i.e. without a lathe). This is the resulting vase!

log 1

You will need:
A log! I found mine when I went for a walk in the woods… If you’re less country than me, try the garden center.
A jam jar
A drill
An auger drill bit
A pencil
An old paintbrush
Wood varnish
Sand paper

In case you’re wondering, my log measure 15 inches tall and 6 1/2 inches wide, and my jar measures 3 inches wide and 4 3/4 inches tall.

Step 1: Use the pencil to draw a circle around your vase (if your vase is larger at the middle than the top and bottom try drawing around the lid).

log 2log 3

Step 2: To make the hole that your jam jar will fit in, first drill a series of holes within the circle that your drew. Make sure you drill a little bit over the circle that you drew to give your vase some wriggle room. Then, to get rid of the wood between your holes and the scalloped edges of your circle, put your drill in each existing hole and angle the drill to one side. Wiggling the drill around in the hole also seemed to work (I’m sure that’s the technical term for it). If, like me, you are not very experienced in using power tools, get someone who is to help you! (Thanks a million dad, you’re a superstar). The hole should be deep enough so that the jar doesn’t poke over the edge – my jar is an inch shorter than the hole.

log 4log 5

Step 3: Break off any loose bits of bark, and give the log a light sanding to remove splinters and such on the surface.

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Step 4: Varnish your log! I just used the one coat because I wanted it to retain it’s organic look.

Now you’re finished! Just fill the jar with water, add some flowers, and find a good spot for your new vase 🙂

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What do you think? My new vase makes me want to pretty up the rest of my room to match, and I love having plants in the house, I think it’s good for the spirit 🙂

19

Experimenting With Fabric Paint: Potato Printing

Since I’m not doing anything else at the moment, I bought a set of fabric paints to play around with. My mum asked me to liven up one of her white t-shirts, and I decided to attack it with potato prints! This was actually a really fun and quick DIY, and I will definitely try it again! Next time I might use vegetables like apples and oranges that don’t need carving because they have such cute shapes already. You might notice that I’m wearing disco pants in these photos. I read in a magazine the other day that you shouldn’t wear disco pant because they are “out” and for some reason it made me really cross – I love my disco pants! So, I’ve decided to wear them all the time (even in the daytime!) in retaliation. Take that bossy fashion lady. Maybe I’ll even treat you to a disco-pants focused outfit post.

experimenting fabric dye 1

(Yes I am posing in my mum’s shirt, I hope she doesn’t mind!)

If you want to try potato printing, you will need:

A potato!
A shirt to print on
Fabric paint
A knife
A paint palette

experimenting natural dye 2

Step 1: Put something under the first layer of your shirt (like newspaper) to prevent paint from leaking onto the back.

Step 2: Carve your potato! I did three circles of different sizes. Cut your potato in half, carve your shape into the flat side of the potato, and then carefully go around the edge with the knife to remove some of the potato outside of your shape (so that your intended shape is raised.)

Step 3: Pour some paint on your palette, dip your potato in, and print onto your fabric! Make sure you wipe the excess paint off the potato first, so that you get a clear print. I had some blobs of paint where I didn’t want them to be, so I covered these up with smaller circles.

experimenting natural dye 4

Step 4: Wait for your paint to dry, and then cover your shirt with greaseproof paper and iron for 2 minutes. This will fix your paint so that you can wash it!

I really like how this turned out, I think simple patterns work the best! What do you think?

experimenting natural dye 4

experimenting natural dye 6

I am STILL in the process of sorting out my uni things since moving back home. I have literally twice as much stuff as space, and deciding which things to store or get rid of is tiring! What are you up to this week?

4

Flavoured Water

In case you haven’t heard, we’ve been having a heatwave in England. Even with the recent thunderstorms, it is super warm. I don’t drink enough water at the best of times, let alone when there’s a heatwave! I made myself some flavoured water, and consuming water is now a whole lot easier. I’m not sure if it’s better for you than normal water but it is tastier, and that’s what matters.

You will need:
Any sort of fruit (except bannana.) Citrus fruit works well, as does cucumber!
A tray or two of ice cubes

Step 1: Chop up your fruit and veg, and muddle it (bash it with a spoon) in your jug! I used lemon, orange, cucumber and melon but in the fututre I’d like to try either cucumber by itself or lemon and orange.

flavoured water 1

flavoured water 2

The thermometer proves how hot it’s been. The photo was even taken at 5pm.

Step 2: Pour in your water and ice cubes and leave the jug in the fridge for an hour or two.

That’s it, simple! I think flavoured water would be really fun to have at dinner parties – the colouful fruit makes it look really classy 🙂 When you’ve finished your jug you can just keep on topping it up with water throughout the day.

flavoured water 3

flavoured water 4Cheers! I hope you’re enjoying the summer if it’s summer where you are. I’m enjoying spending some time with my boyfriend in the north east (we’re getting through season one of Buffy pretty quickly, I’m hooked) and trying not to think about the fact that I’m a graduate!

6

Mexican Eggs

I find it really hard to make lunch exciting sometimes, which is why I love this recipe so much. It’s exciting, tasty and quick to make!  I have adapted the recipe from one in this cookery book. It’s quite a hot recipe, so if you’re not good with spice, use less chilli!

mexican eggs 1

You will need:
3 eggs
1/2 a pepper
1 chilli
1 jalapeno
1 tortilla
1/2 a bag of salad
Mixed herbs

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Step 1: Chop up and fry the jalapeno, chilli and pepper. When they’re soft, crack the eggs into the pan, and stir until they’re cooked.

Step 2: Whilst the eggs and vegetables are frying, slice up the tortillas into strips and fry them in a pan with a little oil.

mexican eggs 3

Step 3: Place the fried tortillas on your plate, and season the egg mixture with salt, pepper and mixed herbs. Then place a handful of salad on top of the tortillas and spoon the egg mixture on top.

Enjoy with salad dressing or chilli sauce!

mexican eggs 4

Much better than soggy sandwiches, don’t you think? What are your favourite lunch recipes?

19

DIY Tassel Rug

When my parents were cleaning out the shed they found these wonderful brown and orange coloured floral curtains. I loved the pattern so much, I figured I had to turn them into something! The heavy curtain material is perfect for a rug 🙂 Although it seems like there are a lot of steps, it was easy to make and could be finished in an evening. Now I just need to find somewhere to put it!

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You will need:
1m of a fabric that you like
2m of a cheap, thick fabric for the base
A ball of wool
Scissors
Needle and thread

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Step 1: Trim any hems off your fabric if it is second hand.

rug 3

Step 2: Cut out your base fabric so that it is a little smaller than twice the size of your patterned fabric (to make room for the hem) then fold your base fabric in half and sew the edges together.

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Step 3: Place your base fabric on top of your patterned fabric, and fold the edges of your patterned fabric onto your base fabric to make a hem. Sew the two together. Below is a step by step photos for hemming the corners. If you want extra security, you can also glue the hem together.

Rug 4

Step 4: Make your tassels! I made 6 tassels for each end of my rug. Below is a step by step on how to make tassels. I wrap the wool around my hand ten times, and then slide the wool off my hands and cut. I use the loose end to tie the top of the circle of wool, and then I cut the other end of the circle of wool. Finally, I cut a seperate piece of wool and tie it around the top of the bunch. I hope that makes sense! Sew your tassels onto the rug so that the loose thread is on the underside.

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Step 5: Run the whole thing through your sewing machine, and be sure to use a wide needle and a loose tension if your fabric is heavy!

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Ta da! Here’s my new upcycled rug 🙂 What do you think? (Excuse my odd socks.) Now I just need a nice new flat of my own to put it in. And maybe some more projects to do so that I can use up the rest of the curtains. It felt great to spend some time relaxing and doing some sewing in front of the voice. I hope you’ve had a lovely weekend.